Gazing into the crystal ball of Australian fintech

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As I write this I’m working out of the Brinc co-working space in Hong Kong, in the heart of the trendy SoHo district. The guys very kindly offered me a hot desk for the day,

One side bonus is that when you work out of a hub there is no shortage of people to chat to.

This morning I met Antoine Cote, co-founder of Enuma Technologies, who showed me an early stage prototype for a credit card that could display your latest transactions via a small screen on the card itself.

The company is also working on an app based digital identity solution for consumers that allows users to only release the identity points they want to when requesting access to services.

Exciting and distracting stuff, and not helpful when I’m supposed to be putting the final touches on my presentation on Australian fintech for tomorrow’s Next Money event. In the final slides I’ve been asked to gaze into my crystal ball and try and envisage what the local market will look like in 2020. No pressure.

EY FinTech Australia Census 2016

While past performance is not indicative of future results (excuse the pun), there really is no better place to start than to recap where the local fintech scene has landed after an incredibly active few years. And the EY Fintech Australia Census 2016 is the perfect place to begin.

Late last year the FinTech Australia, the peak body established in 2015 canvassed the sector and compiled a number of great statistics and insights on the local fintech scene. The infographic below is perfect for a quick overview, otherwise you can read the full report here.

fast-facts-fintech-australia

Highlights/Lowlights

It’s heartening to see that out of the 57 percent of companies who claim they are post-revenue, 27 percent have a customer base larger than 500.

However only 9 percent of companies post-revenue generate over $1M per month. The majority, 41 percent to be exact, generate $50K or less on a monthly basis. And only 14 percent of fintech companies are profitable.

It’s interesting to note the average age of fintech founders is 41 – only 10 percent are under 30. Innovating in financial services is not for the faint of heart, and a deep, intuitive understanding of the complexity of the problems in finance, garnered from experiencing them first hand, is no doubt a huge advantage.

Where to next

37 percent of companies surveyed have less than a year to go until cash reserves dry up, so unless the money fairy visits them over the next 12 months, or they crack the biggest external problem listed by startups in the survey – customer acquisition – my crystal ball tells me, as it would most, a few will fold. However this is a short term prediction, and hardly that insightful.

However what could significantly shape the market over a 3 year horizon are a number of legislative and policy interventions by the Australian Government, who have already made a firm commitment to want to position the country as an APAC fintech leader.

Backing Australian Fintech

In what it claims to be a world first, the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) announced in late December of last year that it would begin to exempt fintech businesses from requiring an Australian Financial Services Licence (AFSL) before launching their product. Fintech companies now have a grace period of 12 months and the ability to service up to 100 customers. This will go a long way to helping startups validate their business model before an inordinate amount of money is committed to an idea.

Just prior to this, in September the Australian Government also amended the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Rules to allow for reporting entities to now gather Know Your Customer (KYC) data on their customers rather than directly from. The distinction is significant, as sourcing information on is easier and cheaper than from, and can possibly be done relatively indirectly.

Finally the biggest event on the fintech horizon will be to what degree fintech companies can access an indviduals banking data. A draft report released by Australia’s Productivity Commission has recommended 3rd parties be given access to financial data, and that a future API framework be developed. If the government ultimately supports this recommendation then the game could significantly change.

My crystal ball is pretty clear – policy changes and government support are now required to really drive the fintech agenda forward. While inroads have been made, there is significant opportunity for improvement. Government procurement of fintech services is a great start, and something they have publicly committed to. But that’s a topic for another post altogether.

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